How do you learn fruity loops

What's the Best DAW for Beginners?

Once you start producing audio, it doesn't take long to make decisions. These decisions will potentially cost you a lot of time and money. One of the first decisions to make is software - which digital audio workstation (DAW) software should you choose?

We asked the question on an open mic a few months ago and the community has been generous with their advice. We'll wrap it up here along with a few thoughts of our own.

Before we get into your options though, let's talk about a few issues first. Just as the shoes I wear aren't for you, there isn't a beginner's DAW that is for everyone. Here are some questions to help clarify which app to start with.


Problems that can influence your decision

I have a couple of children who are learning to drive. You have to decide whether you want to learn in a manual or in an automatic. Learning in an automatic is great because you don't have to learn it all at the same time. While they focus on steering and traffic, braking and displaying, they also don't have to worry about the clutch and gear stick. But if they decide to drive a manual they have to go down the street.

"Learning to Drive" by Tejvan Tettinger on Flickr.

You're in a similar position when choosing a DAW. There is a lot to learn. By learning the industry standards like Pro Tools or Logic Pro, you save some retraining on the route. However, the initial learning curve and effort will be much higher. Would you be better off with an app that is cheaper and less complicated?

Ultimately, that answer is up to you. These questions can help you make a decision.

  1. What is your ultimate music production goal? If you plan to work in a studio, it may be better to start right away with an industry-standard DAW such as Pro Tools. On the other hand, if you're making music at home, finding an app that fits your budget and works on your current computer may be more important.
  2. Do you learn better by doing things step by step or jumping into the deep end ?? Nobody stays a beginner forever, and if the best way to learn is by challenging yourself, you should start with one of the great cannons. On the other hand, the initial learning curve will be pretty steep. Many people will find learning on a beginner DAW a lot easier. In fact, it can have all the features you need.
  3. Are you ready to invest hundreds of dollars in software at this stage of the game? Some of the big DAWs will pay you back by hundreds of dollars. And these costs are justified - consider a substantial investment in professional quality software. But the investment is also associated with a certain level of commitment. Once you are spending that much money, feel free to switch programs later. In fact, you may not be able to afford it! Are you ready to make that investment at this stage of the game? Are you sure you will stick with music production? Once you have more experience, can you make a more informed decision?
  4. Would you like to do some research before you decide? Don't feel pressured to decide now. Before you buy a car, you want a chance to kick the tires. The same goes for DAWs. Many have demo versions. Some DAWs are included in other purchases, such as: B. a keyboard or an audio interface. You might want to try a few before making a purchase. First, spend some time reading your options. Read users' opinions on our Open Mic post, check out some tutorials for the DAW you might buy, or buy a book, or check out the library. Give yourself the opportunity to make an informed decision.

Did that help? From here on, we'll make two sets of recommendations: some DAWs that will get your feet wet, and some DAWs that will let you dive right in. The first set is relatively inexpensive and easier to store. They also have enough features to keep you playing music for a long time - and can be anything you need. The second set of recommendations are industry standard apps that are worth jumping right into this version for.

Of course, these aren't your only options. If you look through the comments at the bottom of the post, you are sure to find more opinions. Take the time to read them and weigh them.


Some DAWs that you can use to get your feet wet

These DAWs are inexpensive and easy to learn, but they have enough features to be useful for some time.

GarageBand

Website: www.apple.com/ilife/garageband
$ 15.00 on the Mac App Store, but comes pre-installed on most Macs.
Runs on Mac OS X

GarageBand is almost the easiest way to access computerized audio - as long as you're using a Mac! While it's so easy to use, each version has more features. Even if you later think of using Logic Pro, it can't hurt to start here.

Audiotuts + readers say:

  • Garage tape. Really easy, but you can make a lot of good music with it. When you have outgrown it, you can upgrade to something a little more sophisticated. (Jakubt)
  • Garage tape (MAC). Acoustica Mixcraft (PC). Garageband is the easiest DAW for hobbyists and absolute beginners. Acoustica Mixcraft looks like a [not-so-great] imitation of Garageband, but it gets the job done. (pierre)
  • As a high school music teacher, I've tried FLstudio, Sonar, GarageBand, and Logic. For a starter, I'd go all the way through GarageBand. You can view / teach all the basics of song creation using multi-tracking, loop, and MIDI / software. My students love it. (Darrin)

Acoustica Mixcraft

Website: www.acoustica.com/mixcraft
Around $ 70 on Amazon ($ 150 for the Pro version)
Runs on Windows

This is as close as possible to GarageBand in the PC world. From their website: "Mixcraft 5 is a powerful yet easy-to-use multitrack recording studio that lets you record audio, arrange loops, remix tracks, compose with virtual instruments, record and edit videos, and create amazingly professional compositions. Simple enough for everyone and powerful enough for professionals. Get a studio for a song with Mixcraft 5! "

Audiotuts + readers say:

  • Garage tape (MAC). Acoustica Mixcraft (PC). Garageband is the easiest DAW for hobbyists and absolute beginners. Acoustica Mixcraft looks like a [not-so-great] imitation of Garageband, but it gets the job done. (pierre)
  • I teach sound engineering for students. I've used FL Studio, Reason, Pro Tools, and Mixcraft. I will be using garage tape for next year. Many of my students come into my program after using FL Studio. You know well. However, I am not very interested in it. Most of the time, the user interface is so small and a bit confusing. I've now switched my beginners to Mixcraft and they are really quick to adopt it. I like the built in sounds and effects and recording through the mboxes was very easy. I like that it can edit videos too. Once my students master the basics, move them to Pro Tools. As noted in previous posts, this is the industry standard. When I introduced Reason to my students, they found it difficult. I think that's because they got so used to other DAWs that they struggled with the learning curve. My old lab was PC-based, my new lab will be MAC-based, so I'll switch the newbies to Garageband and move on to Pro Tools, adding Logic for my advanced students. There is a great book called "Making Music with Garageband and Mixcraft". This does a great job of introducing important concepts like importing, editing, MIDI, recording, etc., and has great projects to be built using these concepts. I highly recommend it. (ABenne66)

REAPER

Website: www.reaper.fm
$ 60 for personal use, $ 225 for professional use
Runs on Windows / Mac

REAPER is a powerful yet affordable DAW that is preferred by many Audiotuts + readers. From the website: "REAPER is digital audio workstation software: a complete audio and MIDI environment for recording, editing, processing, mixing and mastering with multiple tracks."

Audiotuts + readers say:

  • Reaper by far. Powerful, free to try, USB flash drive expires, you can customize it to look like any DAW, great user support. I honestly think Reaper will be one of the next big DAWs. Other than that, my main DAW is Pro Tools. (Brandon)
  • I have to agree with Reaper. I'm primarily a Logic user, but I always have a copy of Reaper on hand and have no problem switching between them. It has to be the simplest / cheapest real DAW that can be used outside the gate. If you are comfortable, you can surpass the limitations of other DAWs too. (FL Studio). (JohnnieTech)
  • In my experience, a beginner doesn't stay a beginner for long, so I'd go for Reaper too. It's cheap, fully featured, and easy to learn. I would tell them to stay away from Audacity (pure and simple, it's NOT a DAW), and I would only recommend FL Studio because it's just not that versatile. (Frosted)
  • The Reaper is still my first choice, many features and easy to understand. Though I've been using GarageBand more and more on my Mac. (Bas)
  • I've looked at other DAWs that most of them were blah? how? What ever? Reaper is good? . Sometimes use this for fun or making music on the street or when I just want to play around. (Jeramiah)
  • Reaper! I hold music production classes and teach Reaper to my students because it's simple, intuitive, and powerful! And cheap! (Doubtful Quip)

FL Studio

Website: flstudio.com
Less than $ 90 for the Fruity Edition and $ 219 for the Producer Edition on Amazon
Runs on Windows

I have fond memories of my children who made music on Fruity Loops when they were younger. They took it into the water like a duck. This app has a different interface and workflow than other DAWs. While it may not be for everyone, it makes more sense for many people. A test drive can be worthwhile.

Audiotuts + readers say:

  • FL Studio for PC and Logic for Mac. Is FL Studio like a game? There is no need for knowledge? Just drag and drop. Logic is the easiest and most powerful DAW? but you have to know a lot Whatever suits you is for beginners. (Dimigo)
  • I worked with Fruity Loops (now FL Studio) in high school and I'm still a fan. It's not as flexible as Ableton Live, but its workflow is a lot simpler, and therefore easier for a budding producer. It's also a lot cheaper than Live. (drrn)
  • I've tried FL Studio. And immediately fell in love with it. It was the most intuitive thing I had worked with. All of my music was produced in FL Studio and / or Audacity (which doesn't count here as it's not a DAW). It would be the only DAW I would recommend to a newbie. Plus, it's relatively cheap. (Mingos)
  • When you run FLstudio, it's simple enough to stay encouraged and simply complex enough to provide you with up-to-date, cross-platform knowledge. It's far from any of the best programs, but for beginners sometimes less is more. It teaches you enough to know what that stuff does. When upgrading DAWs, all you have to do is translate your workstation knowledge instead of building a whole new vocabulary like you would with Audacity or Reaper. The friendly drum looper will bring you to the front the first time you open the program, which you can learn by simply clicking. The apex of complexity is the formula mapping. This is about as complicated as any program, once you find out that the utilities created it specifically for each individual DAW. There's also a blender that's reflective enough to start you off in a more professional workspace, yet friendly enough for your click to demonstrate things well. (Kurt Zimmerman)
  • I started making music in FL Studio in 2004. It might sound strange, but I went from hip hop eJay2, which I knew about in 2002, to FL Studio. So my first DAW was a mix of eJAy and FL Studio. Over the years I tried to change my DAW - it was Cubase, Sonar, Ableton and even Project5. So I returned to the FL Studio 8 years ago anyway. Less than a month ago I got a Mac and said goodbye. to FL and now I'm at Ableton Live.
    Just my story. (Vyacheslav Breakzhead)
  • DAW for beginners? . I think FL Studio is the best DAW for beginners. (Aaron Pecker)
  • FL Studio works the fastest and has the most options in terms of price. I also use Cubase, good for deep editing, but it takes a long time, my mind is not math enough even though I can work with it, it is not fast and musical enough. Ableton Live gives me a start, but confusing to me, really turning things into a finished product. Sonar doesn't make me happy. For many people, the reaper may also work mathematically. (Electric)

Some DAWs to immerse you in right out of the box

These DAWs are expensive and more difficult to learn, but they are industry standard.

Professional tools

Website: www.avid.com/DE/products/family/Pro-Tools
$ 520 on Amazon
Runs on Windows / Mac

Pro Tools has been the industry standard in studios for many years. If you're serious about music production, this should be on your shortlist.

The website offers: "Whether you are in a professional facility, home studio, or on the go, nothing gives you the quality, speed, ability, ease, and inspiration to create the most widely used audio creation like Pro Tools. Production system in the industry "

Audiotuts + readers say:

  • ProTools is also a good place to start, especially when M-Audio hardware is not needed. It's powerful, relatively easy to learn the basics, has the easiest bus routing of any DAW I've worked with, and it's an industry standard. I just want VST plugins to be supported without using a third party wrapper. Again, it's more expensive than FL Studio. (drrn)
  • Adobe Audition, Soundbooth and Cubase were used. You definitely recommend ProTools. Get a used Mbox, then work your way up to a Digi 002 unit. You will not regret it. (Tyler)
  • For beginners: record? Professional tools !! Make music? Logic!! Perform live? Ableton Live or Mainstage !! (pedro)
  • I started with Slinky CD Rom on a Windows PC, one track out of a dozen sounded okay, but everyone was fun to write, practice splicing lyric loops and guitar leads, and was impressed by the super psychedelic light show. Moved to the Cakewalk XL 2002 where I had absolutely no chance, too confusing and darn difficult, as was Sound Studio II. Then I recorded the Pro Tools M Box Mini 2, with Reason Adapted, the love affair started the rest of my life went down the drain, the grass got so high that I kept forgetting to mow the lawn because I was constantly in one of the reasons, or Pro Tools or You Tube, watching instructional videos, reading books, magazines, blog pages and dismantling other people's songs to actually see how they came up with effects. Moved to Reason 4, then Pro Tools 8. Everything was great. He worked in this old Windows XP for almost two years with no maintenance on the computer, just a busy campaign of burning drives, erasing and defragmenting and cleaning the discs, and holding the laser part with CD cleaner discs. I still have Frooty Loops 2 that I use sometimes, Cakewalk and Sound Studio. Well, a little dusty to say the least. I still can't understand her. I recently received a KeyRig 49 M Audio. Now I just want to give up Windows XP and get an Apple. (Nick108)
  • I grew up with Cool Edit Pro (later bought by Adobe and renamed Adobe Audition), and while I still play with it every now and then, today's newbies probably have more options.Audacity is a great option to get your feet wet for free. However, if you're really interested in learning DAWs, then you should definitely jump into Logic or Pro Tools. (James Marshall Owen)

Logic Studio

Website: www.apple.com/logicstudio
Around $ 440 on Amazon
Runs on Mac OS X

Logic Studio includes Logic Pro, Mainstage, and other audio apps. It's a favorite among Audiotuts + writers. From the website: "Logic Studio is a suite of professional-grade applications that let you write, record, edit, mix, and perform - without getting too technical. It's also a huge collection of plug-ins and sounds."

It's also the "logical" choice if you're looking to move up from GarageBand. "Are you ready to do more with your music? Switching from GarageBand to Logic Studio is easy - you can open your projects and start where you left off."

Audiotuts + readers say:

  • I would tell him or her to go straight for Logic. The GUI is the easiest to learn and too bad it's powerful! The problem is, not everyone owns a Mac. Any software that looks like Logic? (BernauZer)
  • FL Studio for PC and Logic for Mac. Is FL Studio like a game? There is no need for knowledge? Just drag and drop. Logic is the easiest and most powerful DAW? but you have to know a lot Whatever suits you is for beginners. (Dimigo)
  • The second choice for FLStudio is Logic Pro. But honestly, the way the program looks and feels (in my opinion) doesn't take the user very seriously, with the cheesy instrument image tabs and soft gray scheme. Logic Pro feels like a choke-safe toy to me, but FLstudio is even more fun. (Kurt Zimmerman)
  • For beginners: record? Professional tools !! Make music? Logic!! Perform live? Ableton Live or Mainstage !! (pedro)
  • I grew up with Cool Edit Pro (later bought by Adobe and renamed Adobe Audition), and while I still play with it every now and then, today's newbies probably have more options. Audacity is a great option to get your feet wet for free. However, if you're really interested in learning DAWs, then you should definitely jump into Logic or Pro Tools. (James Marshall Owen)

Ableton Live

Website: http://www.ableton.com/
$ 499 on Amazon
Runs on Windows / Mac

Ableton Live is designed for live musicians and is another DAW alternative if performance is a priority. "Ableton Live is about making music; for composition, songwriting, recording, production, remixing and live performance. Live non-linear, intuitive flow, as well as powerful real-time editing capabilities and flexible performance options make it a unique studio tool and a favorite for live performers. "

Audiotuts + readers say:

  • Ableton all the way. Complex, but still so intuitive and really inspiring at the beginning. (Serbian)
  • After mastering Garageband, Ableton is the one. I'm a huge Ableton fan myself and have been using it for years. Very intuitive, and the session view makes it very easy to start jamming in no time. (pierre)
  • It depends on what kind of music you want to make. If you want to do a lot of samples or perform live performances with samples, Ableton is my choice. You can get a copy for free when you buy things like a keyboard or audio interface (which you should invest in, by the way). For the beginner, M-Audio has some decent AI around $ 115 that comes with a free version of Pro Tools. Another excellent DAW, especially if you're recording live, is Presonus Studio One Artist, which I got on sale for $ 30. (Robert Jensen)
  • For beginners: record? Professional tools !! Make music? Logic!! Perform live? Ableton Live or Mainstage !! (pedro)
  • I started making music in FL Studio in 2004. It might sound strange, but I went from hip hop eJay2, which I knew about in 2002, to FL Studio. So my first DAW was a mix of eJAy and FL Studio. Over the years I tried to change my DAW - it was Cubase, Sonar, Ableton and even Project5. So I returned to the FL Studio 8 years ago anyway. Less than a month ago I got a Mac and said goodbye. to FL and now I'm at Ableton Live.
    Just my story. (Vyacheslav Breakzhead)
  • Using Ableton Live since version 3? 4? waaay back when it first came out. It's pretty much perfect for audio learning since everyone is using it! (Jeramiah)

Conclusion

So there are a number of options that you can use to decide which DAW to buy. A smart second step would be to download some demos and try them out.

If you need additional help, Envato Studio has audio experts to assist you with all aspects of an audio project, from audio editing to sound design and more.

I haven't covered all of the opinions listed on the Open Mic. If you would appreciate feedback from more people, I would encourage you to do so. And if you want to add your own opinion, please leave it in the comments below.

Finally, I would like to leave the thoughts of Audiotuts + reader Jeremiah to you. He's old and wise and I enjoyed reading his take on the DAWs he tried. It's almost a poem. Here it is:


Was my way through the audio jungle? (shows my age here)
- Amiga 500 w / Octamed and 4-track tape recorder!
- acid 2.0
- Fruity loops
- Sound Forge

then?
- acidity 5.0,
- Sound Forge 4.0

I started messing around with Cubase, Nuendo, etc. I found it fiddly.
With Acid until the launch of Ableton Live.

then?
Using Ableton Live since version 3? 4? waaay back when it first came out.
It's pretty much perfect for audio learning since everyone is using it!
I've looked at other DAWs that most of them were blah? how? What ever?
Reaper is good? Sometimes they use this for fun or to make music on the go
or if I just want to play around.

But now I'm using a combination
Audition 5.5 * ideal for game audio dev
Ableton 8 for all music
and Pro Tools 9 for all posts.

Just tried everything else? . I become the master of some tools
All of the sticks and stones of various sizes can still make cave paintings in the right hands.
Is it really a personal taste? Happy ?? Yes we are.

Ableton is good for solo musicians / composers, nerds with more experimental / electronic or acoustic things, sound design and vibe. Play automation with LFOs, but yeah everyone uses it.

Reaper is good when you want to do the bandy thing and use mixers and studio setups
(Poor Man's Pro Tools). Good for your average DIY studio setup. It's pretty neat as you can play around with it to make it more suitable for you, run on crappy computers, and it's pretty cool.

Pro Tools is good for sound design and anything audio for picture, and has decent hardware / computers / plugins. can sometimes look like a top notch model.

Logic is like Pro Tools and Ableton had a baby.
GarageBand is just Logic's little brother.

FL Studio works well for electronic music like Techno / Trance / Electro / Breaks etc.
Audition 5.5 is suitable for audio / file management of games etc., batch processing, multi-track sound design and editing as well as all audio asset management.

These are my 2 cents, spend how you want.