Why doesn't HP have a parallel port

When HP doesn't need you anymore

prehistory

At some point it will hit everyone - computers. Then it's time to say goodbye to each other and buy a new one. After the end of Vista, I now hoped to find a good successor to Windows XP in Windows 7.

So I bought a new Windows 7 Home Premium 64-fired computer. The hardware check, which was still carried out on the old system, was already promising. All PCI cards and all external devices would be Windows 7 capable.

Moving to Windows 7

The move to Windows 7 was surprisingly calm. With the exception of the WLAN stick, which needed some tutoring with a driver, everything actually worked immediately. The Bluetooth stick, the old scanner, the much older printer, the external hard drive, the burner. Hey, that's the way it should be.

I now have several printers. My main printer is an old HP 930C. An indestructible device that has been with me for over 10 years. I don't even want to know how much money HP made from me. Despite various refill cartridges, a lot of money should have ended up in the USA.

As I said, the installation went smoothly. The system also installed the retrofitted duplex unit flawlessly.

But happiness ends quickly

Today, less than a month after switching to Windows 7, I noticed a crucial problem: when I wanted to print on a C5 envelope, for which the old printer is ideal, I recognized a problem with the driver. No user-defined paper formats can be set there! There is only one standard selection that C5 does not include.

Amazed, I looked at the HP homepage and wanted a more up-to-date driver there. But there is only one content-free standard drivel: the driver is integrated in Windows 7. Here and there a subtle hint that certain functions no longer work. So I can no longer display the estimated ink level. Why not?

I didn't find any information on the other pages either. So I contacted HP support.

He sent me an email back. Content: Unlucky, from 1st February 2010 there will be no more support for you. Only a paid hotline or the content-free user-help-user forum.

Hey, brilliant: I've been shoving money into HP for over 10 years and what do I get for it. A typical content-free, absolutely not helpful email with the content is just 25 days late. Sorry, but what kind of arrogance is that? You inquire beforehand whether all devices are working before the retrofit, after an approval "everything ok" you retrofit, then you can no longer work with them and then get thrown at the head that you are just too late. Or call a hotline that costs money, and with this problem will probably say, "Sorry, not possible - but this information costs you 10 euros."

When I asked if this was the usual answer for 10 years of buying ink, I got no answer, of course. HP simply doesn't care about individual customers.

It is clear to me: buy the cheapest printer in the future and then just put in refill cartridges. If it breaks after two years, throw it away, use the cheapest and refill ink again. That's a shame: because of the environment and because of the lack of sustainability. But that's the way it should be.