Who is Artemis 1

Mission Artemis 1: NASA wants to go back to the moon - missile test is successful

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With the Artemis 1 mission, NASA wants to bring people back to the moon. The US space agency has now tested the engines of a new launcher.

  • For the first time since 1972, NASA wants to bring astronauts to the moon again.

  • The US space agency has now successfully tested the engines for a new rocket.

  • The Artemis 1 mission is scheduled to start as a test flight to the moon this year.

The US space agency NASA has successfully tested the rocket's engines for its new Artemis lunar program. NASA announced that all four engines of the new Space Launch System (SLS) would have ignited at the same time during the test on Thursday in the Stennis Space Center in the state of Mississippi. The test ignition lasted eight minutes as planned and generated a maximum thrust of 7.1 million Newtons.

During a test in January, the missile's main stage RS-25 engines had not worked as intended. The test ignition stopped after one minute. According to NASA, "no major repairs" were still necessary on the rocket.

Three Artemis missions until 2024

In the control center, the relief was great after the successful test on Thursday. "The applause says a lot about how the team is feeling right now," said Nasa engineer Bill Wrobel, who is responsible for the test, in a live stream. The mood is "pretty good" right now.

For the first time since 1972, NASA wants to bring astronauts to the moon with the huge SLS rockets and an Orion space capsule. The Artemis 1 mission is scheduled to start as a test flight to the moon at the end of this year. Initially without a crew, she should orbit the moon and then return to earth. With Artemis 2, astronauts are expected to orbit the moon in 2023. Only Artemis 3 will actually land on Earth's satellite with astronauts in 2024.