Many aspies hate cucumbers

I hate going to work

  • Androidler wrote:

    According to this, most of them are unemployed or have great difficulties on the 1st job market or do temporary work, etc.

    Why there is arguments about careers etc. in a self-help forum is astonishing anyway.
    Everyone has different construction sites I think (RW).
    Even if the majority of the Aspies have difficulties in the 1st job market or are unemployed, this means that a smaller part can manage that far.

    Whoever gets along probably would rather write something on the subject than someone who "struggles" with it anyway (RW).
    And if you are already successful professionally, questions like:
    how can I position myself better / earn better money.

    And since I know that these are topics that move large parts of humanity, I am not at all surprised that the topic also appears here.
  • Androidler wrote:

    Sorry, when I read this, I feel a lot more reminiscent of a nerd than an aspie. According to this, 50% of electronics and computer science students would be aspies.

    According to psychiatrists and specialist literature, Asperger's is a severe disability that makes normal everyday life almost impossible and is associated with many stereotypes, compulsions, fears, etc. It was the same in the SHG.

    What I read here partly reminds me of the normal IT and electrical engineering students from the TH
    Thanks for this post. Some discussions are possibly only of an abstract or theoretical nature. -)


    Androidler wrote:

    But it is only autistic when everyday life is SIGNIFICANTLY impaired. Otherwise I find behaviors in every NT that indicate autism. For me, Bill Gates or Steve Jobs or Willy Brandt or Albert Einstein are not yet autistic. Everyone, especially everyone who is intelligent, has behavior that is slightly psychological. But you are only sick or disabled when it shapes your whole life and every day. Otherwise everyone would be sick. In a certain way we all suffer from harm, only the patient is severely impaired and normal autistic people can hardly cope without external help.
    Thank you for this contribution too.
  • Androidler wrote:

    But it is only autistic when everyday life is SIGNIFICANTLY impaired
    The official formulation (DSM) is.


    To what extent does a distinction between normal and abnormal autistic people help you in this discussion? You may not be able to understand the diagnosis of some. That does not surprise me. I can't either, but I accept that. In order to be able to judge that, you have to deal intensively with a person in different situations. A "five-minute contact" is nowhere near enough - this is confirmed many times in the forum.
    In any case, my own diagnostics affected my private life very intensively. What they showed me was terrifying for me. I am fortunate to have an environment in which I can function. Whenever I leave this environment, my problems are clearly visible.

    You seem very frustrated to me. I can only agree with the advice of the others: Put yourself on a waiting list for diagnostics so that an expert can look at it, and stop tormenting yourself with your own comparisons between specialist literature and observed autistic people.
  • 65536 wrote:

    That’s one of the reasons why I’m already thinking about writing my master’s thesis at the university.
    I would advise against that. The master's thesis is the conclusion, a topic that you deal with intensively and accumulate a lot of knowledge. It can be formative for the following profession. Ideally, you write your thesis in a place where you would like to work after your studies anyway. This also eliminates the grueling application process, where you have poor chances as a career starter, unless the topic of the master's thesis is of interest to pretty much every company. But if you are already in the company, then a subsequent job is often just a formality - if there is a vacancy. Unfortunately, the vacancy wasn't the case for me either, but a year later the company was sold and broken up anyway.

    Hypatia wrote:

    In the software area, for example, MATSE or IT specialists with a bachelor's degree in computer science or the like. to be compared.
    But that has always been the case - if you're just looking for a programmer, you don't need a computer scientist (= algorithm researcher)

    Shenya wrote:

    So I prefer it when a doctor can treat well than when he is good at research. I also think that a doctorate does not necessarily have to have something to do with research. For me it says that someone at a university has dealt very intensively with a topic, is now an expert in it and has also proven this with a doctoral thesis. I don't get anything from researching doctors in everyday life. Research is also important, but the doctors you go to when you're sick must first and foremost be able to treat.
    It is not for nothing that the expensive "head physician treatment" of private patients is ridiculed. Who wants a doctor who does administrative work and research all day?

    Androidler wrote:

    According to this, 50% of electronics and computer science students would be aspies.

    According to psychiatrists and specialist literature, Asperger's is a severe disability
    The proportion of nerd in my course was very high. But most of them were hardly socially restricted.

    Autism is a serious disability. Asperger's is a mild form of it.
    In any case, it does not rule out being able to be professionally good.
    But at university you don't learn how to deal with your colleagues, how to communicate or even present something convincingly, or how to display all the acoustic and visual distraction stimuli.
    Above all, Asperger's is a spectrum. You can have only a few restrictions or the whole program.
    _, .- o ~ ^ ° ´` ° ^ ~ o -., _ I eat flowers ..., .- o ~ ^ ° ´` ° ^ ~ o -., _
  • Androidler wrote:

    Sorry, when I read this, I feel a lot more reminiscent of a nerd than an aspie. According to this, 50% of electronics and computer science students would be aspies.

    According to psychiatrists and specialist literature, Asperger's is a severe disability that makes normal everyday life almost impossible and is associated with many stereotypes, compulsions, fears, etc. It was the same in the SHG.

    What I read here partly reminds me of the normal IT and electrical engineering students from the TH
    Nevertheless, it took ages for this severe disability to even get a name for many and we still have to discuss what autism actually is even in 2016. According to my recollections, it is not the case that every one of today's aspies went straight to the special school because as a child they were so beyond the "neurotype" that a normal school would have been impossible. Some even went to university. Some have been able to gain a foothold in professional life and some are even married with a wife and child. You know that from the forum, you know that from documentaries. If it is almost impossible for someone to take part in everyday life, it does not have to mean that there are not also people with AS who have made progress in life and nowadays get along better than they used to be. If progress or improvement were not possible, then everything could be dropped right away. And that someone does not immediately remind you of an aspie, that should not be so rare if almost the whole life was always focused on going the path that everyone goes.
    In letters of gold on a snow white kite I will write "I love you"
    And send it soaring high above you for all to read
  • Androidler wrote:

    But career, department head, wife, children, house, friends, popular with colleagues sounds extremely little like autistic.
    We had already discussed two or three times.
    When you hear about "successful" autistic people, it becomes more difficult to cite your own autism as the cause of everything that you fail in your own life.
    It’s so nice and comfortable.

    There are autistic people who fail to do what they want and probably don't even try.
    But there are also those who say to themselves every day: "It's difficult, but I can do it." And who actually manage to do it.
    I am one of the latter.
  • zaph wrote:

    Androidler wrote:

    But career, department head, wife, children, house, friends, popular with colleagues sounds extremely little like autistic.
    We had already discussed two or three times. When you hear about "successful" autistic people, it is more difficult to use your own autism as the cause of everything that you fail in your own life.
    It's so nice and comfortable.

    There are autistic people who fail to do what they want and probably don't even try.
    But there are also those who say to themselves every day: "It's difficult, but I can do it." And they actually manage it.
    I am one of the latter.
    Or they try a hundred times and eventually become desperate. Your restrictions are probably also manageable, otherwise you wouldn't be able to do that at all. To accuse people of being too lazy is very bold.
  • lady sasha wrote:

    The mental underload is no different for me. However, only what you have achieved on paper counts bw. What qualifications are there, if there are none, the employer doesn't care what else you can do, unfortunately.
    The problem with this is that you can't prove what you say you can. So I would somehow provide the proof and then show it, for example by doing something and then presenting it on your own homepage.

    lady sasha wrote:

    How do you actually get to Auticon, and what exactly do you do as an employee there?
    Ask Guhgel or, better still, visit his homepage.


    Shenya wrote:

    (Incidentally, TV tip: "Attention emergency room" at Kabel Eins, I find it interesting).
    Is that realistic or a series or even scripted?


    65536 wrote:

    One of them did something with control engineering in his practical semester and was told that controls with fuzzy logic were rather out of date, and these are dealt with in detail in the lecture.
    I've also heard that fuzzy is yesterday's news. And if something like that is still part of the lecture, you should ask the professor if he / she doesn't even want to update the script. There are professors who have probably always read the same stuff for 20 years. For me pure laziness.

    65536 wrote:

    The usual PID controller, when a control loop begins to oscillate, etc. was already part of the Bachelor's degree.
    That's not the problem either. The challenge is to get the entire regulation so that it cannot start to oscillate under any realistic circumstances and that takes a very long time. Whereby realistic would not be less than some imaginative test scenarios, but reality is more varied than the test scenarios. Who thinks of blinking sunlight? But that's the way it is, the sun is shining, a tree, some wind, and in the shade / sunlight a sensor from several different sensors.

    65536 wrote:

    if you don't feel like it at all, you can skip a lecture, and you usually have more free time than at work.
    I wouldn't leave it like that. With the times for preparation and follow-up / working out internships, learning for exams, etc., that was a 40-hour job for me, especially in the undergraduate studies aka bachelor phase. Nobody was with us during that time and took an elective. Later that was entirely possible.

    With the supervisor from the company: Ok, if he of course gives tips on how to write something better, etc., then that's ok. I know other strories, where the template was given, so a wordy thing, where you have to nibble in your text in a given form. I think that's completely wrong.

    65536 wrote:

    I would prefer to have a 35-hour week at work and (easy) <30 minutes driving time.

    I will certainly get into trouble with that, because I am apparently relatively good professionally, but not psychologically resilient.
    At the latest when the company says, from next Monday to the end of September, 48 hours / week is mandatory, and 5 hours on Saturdays are also mandatory. I had something like that in the ex-company twice, with the second time being the Saturday requirement. The practice hours are of course not paid for, but as compensation for free time, and at some point they fall under the table. At kununu, the ex-company is only rated with around 1.5 stars. The company is far from being a model employer.

    65536 wrote:

    Unfortunately you are probably one of the first to be laid off when the company is doing badly: After all, the department costs money and does not generate direct sales.
    In times of crisis, the first to go is the loaner. In our department that was up to 70% of the staff, and there were a lot of cucumbers. How they got their diploma k. A. One of them was there who flew up because he didn't have one. He couldn't even convert amps into milliamps.
    But as far as I know, nobody was dismissed from our pre-development department because of a crisis, because people create the products of the future and if there is suddenly a lack of that, the innovation crisis comes after the economic crisis and no OEM commissions the supplier (I was busy there) .

    65536 wrote:

    Theses at the university should usually be less time-consuming. That’s one of the reasons why I’m thinking about writing my master’s thesis at the university.
    Do not do! Why? I read such a work once. Somebody developed a power supply for the HS laboratory, nothing special, more of an act of desperation. I read the part through more or less completely and found that it wrote somewhere "the manufacturer suggests a value of 10,000 but I tried it with 10 and it was better". Yes what? How better? Can not be. Explain! But there is nothing further. The enormous deviation cannot be better, rather a deviation from possibly. 20% for fine tuning. And in general the power supply had an efficiency of a mere 50% and that with a conventional transformer and secondary buck / boost regulator.
    In addition, if you did the master's thesis in the company, you would prove that you know and meet their requirements, teamwork and everything that has to do with working in the company, that would also be proven. Some people in companies also say that some theses were created in an ivory tower, more or less far from reality, the real requirements.
    The highest form of happiness is a life with some degree of madness.Erasmus of Rotterdam (1465/1469 - 1536)
  • Nerve bundle wrote:

    The problem with this is that you can't prove what you say you can. So I would somehow provide the proof and then show it, for example by doing something and then presenting it on your own homepage.
    I understand your approach, of course you can't prove it if you don't have said skills as evidence. Your idea with the homepage seems to be quite nice, I only doubt whether it would count for the employer.

    We live in a bureaucratic society, we even have to prove our own existence in the form of documents, identity cards, etc. I therefore believe that presenting your own skills on a homepage would not bear fruit.

    I will find out more about Auticon. I only asked the person because they generally addressed it, could have been that the person knew it directly.
  • Is realistic in my opinion. The camera team films everyday life in various emergency rooms in various hospitals. The patients who are ready are also interviewed a bit and have to tell what happened. Those who do not want that are blurred so that they cannot be recognized. Doctors tell a little about the diseases and how certain processes work. An episode is only 30 minutes long.
    Everything will be galactically fine.
  • Androidler wrote:

    But career, department head, wife, children, house, friends, popular with colleagues sounds extremely little like autistic.

    Androidler wrote:

    But it is only autistic when everyday life is SIGNIFICANTLY impaired.
    I have a question for you, Android people. If you are so severely affected by autism, as you always write, and are so severely disabled, how is it that you were only diagnosed as an adult?
    Could it be that you are not as extremely badly affected as you always claim?

    I find it unfair that you classify autistic people who have achieved something in life as "unautistic". Incidentally, Hans Asperger wrote that people with autism are often more successful than average when they work in their talented areas. Maybe Hans Asperger didn't know the area as well as you did.

    Autism explains a lot, but does not serve as an excuse for everything. If you fail in life and say: "Autism alone is to blame", you make it too easy for yourself.