Who wrote the book of Sanditon

  • Title: Sanditon


    Publisher: dtv

    Binding: paperback

    Number of pages: 384

    ISBN: 9783423126663

    Date: August 1999

  • 4.4 of 5 stars with 6 ratings

    88,3% satisfaction
  • Synopsis of "Sanditon"

    A turbulent society ... As always, Jane Austen is about marriage, this time the setting is the idyllic English seaside resort of Sanditon. When Charlotte Heywood arrives there, she immediately finds herself in a turbulent society. When Jane Austen died in 1817, the novel was unfinished. In 1975 the Austen admirer Marie Dobbs undertook to artfully spin the plot and brought together so many happy couples in such an entertaining way that it is difficult to believe that Jane Austen did not end the story herself.
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    First of all, the novel was started by Jane Austen, but was never finished due to her death. It was not until years later in the 1970s that Marie Dobbs took the risk of spinning the story further, of which only about eleven chapters previously existed.
    But all the typical Austen characters were already created in these early stories and the subject area of ​​this author was always very similar. Nevertheless, Marie Dobbs managed a feat by imitating Jane Austen's style very well, I think.

    The heroine Charlotte Heywood is on vacation in the (fictional) seaside resort of Sanditon, where she not only gets to know the different residents and their peculiarities, but also the usual entanglements in the hearts of the other young people present. However, she believes that she can devote herself to observation, free from emotions - anyone who knows Jane Austen will of course very soon know that things have to go badly wrong.

    The end of the story is clear very quickly, but as always the refreshing dialogues, especially between Charlotte and the eloquent Sidney Parker, as well as the descriptions of the individual characters and activities are in the foreground. The beginning is quite leisurely and the reader needs a few pages to sort through the many people in his mind (or was that because of my many interruptions?), But the story then gains momentum and tension until finally all entanglements dissolve in good pleasure.

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    It was not until years later in the 1970s that Marie Dobbs took the risk of spinning the story further, of which only about eleven chapters previously existed.

    In the 1870s or in the 1970s?

    I can't really imagine that novels can turn out so well when two or more authors are working on them. (Except when it's a permanent team, like Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child)

    "Books are ships which pass through the vast sea of ​​time."
    (Francis Bacon)

    Paradise on earth: 51.509173, -0.135998

  • In the 1870s or in the 1970s?

    I have added the short description from Amazon here again, it is exactly there:

    Brief description
    As always, Jane Austen is about marriage making, this time the setting is the idyllic English seaside resort of Sanditon. When Charlotte Heywood arrives there, she immediately finds herself in a turbulent society. When Jane Austen died in 1817, the novel was unfinished. In 1975, the Austen admirer Marie Dobbs undertook to artfully spin the plot and brought together so many happy couples in such an entertaining way that it is difficult to believe that Jane Austen did not end the story herself.

    I read "Sanditon" several years ago and liked the story a lot. Better than The Watsons, the other unfinished novel by Jane Austen that was finished after her death. I didn't notice the difference in writing style back then, Marie Dobbs matched Jane Austen's style well. Fortunately, it often goes very wrong.
    However, I'm just wondering why I actually gave the book five stars. It's really nice, but when I compare it to other five star books by Jane Austen, it's a bit weaker. I will therefore correct my rating to four stars.

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    History, Classics, Love & Romance, England 17-19 JH.

    You were a little faster than me, Hermia!

    I can't really imagine that novels can turn out so well when two or more authors are working on them. (Except when it's a permanent team, like Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child)

    In principle, I would not see it that way. It's true here and there (e.g. with "Gone with the Wind" and "Scarlett"), but really good writers seem to know how to imitate a style very accurately. It always depends on how well the person concerned has dealt with the literature and whether it was just about "borrowing" the characters and their history, possibly for marketing reasons, or whether one deals intensively with the writing style.
    Why shouldn't there be good imitators - surely they also exist in art? Sure, an expert can usually distinguish an original from an imitation there - but the ordinary layman usually cannot. Sometimes the imitations are so good that they are considered a work of art in their own right.

    Back to Jane Austen - as I said, I think Marie Dobbs' work is very successful, as are some of Joan Aiken's references to Jane Austen (though not all!). I can agree with Hermia that the original Jane Austen classics are better, but that is why I would not subtract a star here - if there were an even finer scale, I would differentiate if necessary, but with only five gradations, I have because the "4-star" level is already different. ;) But it is usually not the case that all books rated with 5 stars are just as good ...

  • I am actually always skeptical when a book by a certain author is finished by someone else after his untimely death - especially when, like here, there is so much time in between. But since many people rave about the book and think that the difference is barely noticeable or not at all (including Jane Austen fans who usually view it very critically), I bought the book and will probably already be start reading today and then report.

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    especially when, like here, there is so much time in between.

    That's exactly the point. I imagine it would be very difficult for a very good writer of our day to understand the social conventions of the early 19th century in such a way that the modern part of the novel appears authentic (-> with regard to the style of Jane Austen) .

    I bought the book and will probably even start reading today and then report.

    I'm really looking forward to your report.

    "Books are ships which pass through the vast sea of ​​time."
    (Francis Bacon)

    Paradise on earth: 51.509173, -0.135998

  • That's exactly the point. I imagine it would be very difficult for a very good writer of our day to understand the social conventions of the early 19th century in such a way that the modern part of the novel appears authentic (-> with regard to the style of Jane Austen) .

    I'm really looking forward to your report.

    I'm only in the 3rd chapter in the meantime and the first 11 (I think) are supposed to be from Jane Austen herself, so I can't say that yet. I also made "the mistake" and bought the translated edition so that it might not be noticed by the translation. It looks like you can only buy the started parts and the finished parts in English.

    I will still be happy to report.

  • That's exactly the point. I imagine it would be very difficult for a very good writer of our day to understand the social conventions of the early 19th century in such a way that the modern part of the novel appears authentic (-> with regard to the style of Jane Austen) .


    To be honest, I'm rather suspicious of that, but I found this book very successful. By the way, Joan Aiken has also written some "follow-up novels" that are very similar to Jane Austen's style.

    I also made "the mistake" and bought the translated edition so that it might not be noticed by the translation.


    Hmm, of course it could be because I didn't notice anything. I have the same edition as Anriel, so a German one.

    It looks like you can only buy the started parts and the finished parts in English.

    I don't get the sentence right now - do you think this version, which was finished by Marie Dobbs, does not exist in English? I found a version, but it's only needed. ;)

  • @hermia:
    Yes, I expressed myself a little strangely. I meant that there is always only the fragments in English - or the complete translation, but only used.

  • I just looked a little more on the German-language Jane Austen info page and came across a list that contains a lot of sequels by different authors: Click!